Thursday, July 09, 2009

"We Can Become the Religion for Our Time"

I don't think that the Dalai Lama talks like that about his mission in the world.

I think Unitarian Universalism is honest and authentic. I think that it has changed my life, made me happier and made me a better person. I recommend it to everyone.

But its value, and its mission, is not dependent on its success, or even its relevance to the overall culture.

4 comments:

bstr said...

i don't know if your reference is Jefferson or Morales. Wondering if i could determine more by reading earlier material i found a different question. On "two paths". under the expectations of a minister. you do not mention CEO. Today that is an important and controversial matter for many Search Committees.

Robin Edgar said...

"I think Unitarian Universalism is honest and authentic. I think that it has changed my life, made me happier and made me a better person. I recommend it to everyone."

I wish I could say the same LT.

Unfortunately I cannot with integrity say the above, nor can many other people who have found U*Us, including U*U clergy and UUA leaders, and thus by extension U*Uism *as practiced*. . . to be considerably "less than honest" and "less than authentic". Still, I will continue to try to persuade U*Us to be more honest and more authentic than I and other people have found them to be so far. . .

President Peter Morales' campaign slogan cum U*U mantra is indeed open to some question and I have questioned it. Perhaps the reason that the Dalai Lama Dalai Lama does not talk like that about Buddhism is because he is secure in the knowledge that Buddhism already *is* counted amongst the world's great religions whereas Unitarian*UNiversalism is but a "tiny, declining, fringe religion" according to President Morales himself. . .

Chalicechick said...

I'm was not a Morales supporter, but I will confess that I'm inclined to give the man a pass on his campaign slogan.

As for spreading Unitarian Universalism throughout the world, on the whole, we're doing about as well as any other liberal or moderate church, better than most of them, at holding on to members.

I hope the root issue here isn't that so many UUs want the UUA to be a political power player and for Congress to care what it thinks, but, suffice to say, with more members and a bigger church, we could do a lot more good. I would love it if every city had a bunch of UU churches doing the charitable work my church does, for example.

CC

Robin Edgar said...

"As for spreading Unitarian Universalism throughout the world, on the whole, we're doing about as well as any other liberal or moderate church, better than most of them, at holding on to members."

Really CC? There are less than 5000 U*Us in the whole of the U.K., a similar number in Canada, far fewer in many other countries in Europe, Asia and Africa. Compare those numbers to any number of other liberal Christian denominations, to say nothing of Reform Judaism. . . and U*Uism is wa*a*a*ay behind many if not most of them. Do you or any other U*U dare to compare the number of U*Us in Canada with the number of members of the liberal Christian United Church of Canada?